Literature

Poison tea
Audio

Kathryn Harkup is a chemist with an expertise in poison. She’s made a close study of a famous poisoner that employed everything from arsenic to cyanide to knock off close to 300 (fictional) victims: Agatha Christie, the mystery writer.

Length: 
12:05
"The Land at the End of the World" by António Lobo Antunes
Bookmarks

The author of "The Sympathizer" recommends António Lobo Antunes' novel.

The Velvet Hours
Audio

Alyson Richman is the author of six historical novels. Her latest is called "The Velvet Hours" and it was inspired by a recent newspaper story in the Paris press.

Length: 
11:13
"If Beale Street Could Talk" by James Baldwin
Bookmarks

The author of "Another Brooklyn" recommends a James Baldwin novel she says belongs on everyone's bookshelf.

"I Will Bear Witness" by Victor Klemperer
Bookmarks

The author of "Lincoln in the Bardo" recommends Victor Klemperer's two-volume diary that reads as a slow-motion picture of what the Holocaust looked like before it was known Holocaust.

Roadtrip
Audio

Amy Wallace-Havens didn’t care whether David was famous, or even whether he was a writer. He was just her big brother. Anne spoke with her about a year after his death.
 

Length: 
9:18
Cruises suck
Audio

David Foster Wallace's essays have their own unique cult following. There’s one, “A Supposedly Fun Thing I’ll Never Do Again,” which is a hilarious diatribe about cruise ships, which convinced many of us we should never, ever go on a cruise.

water
Articles

David Foster Wallace gave the commencement speech at Kenyon College in 2005. It was popular enough to eventually be published in a thin little book called “This Is Water.”

Length: 
3:23
Cracked cover
Articles

Even this many years later, it’s hard to underestimate what a popular and controversial writer David Foster Wallace still is. There’s even an entire field of "David Foster Wallace Studies" — one of its leaders is Clare Hayes-Brady.

Length: 
12:05
David Foster Wallace
Airdates: 
September 08, 2018

On the tenth anniversary of his suicide, David Foster Wallace faces renewed criticism over his treatment of women, in his life and work. Fans and critics are re-reading his work, struggling to reconcile genius with misogyny.More

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