We've Had 30 Years Of Prozac. Why Are We Still Depressed?

John Campbell (CC0) / enviied (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0) / Lis Ferla (CC BY-NC 2.0) / Chris Geatch (CC BY-NC 2.0) / Mark Riechers (TTBOOK)

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Modern anti-depressants have saved a lot of minds. And lives. But our 30-year experiment with modern anti-depressants is taking a toll. What have they done to our bodies? And how do we navigate that trade-off between body and mind? Is it clear that they even work?

There are a lot of us who struggle with mood disorders or mental illness of one sort or another. If you do, we here at TTBOOK want you to know that you’re not alone. If you're looking for more in-depth knowledge on what you might be going through, the National Alliance on Mental Illness is an incredible resource.

And if you just need something to elevate your spirit, check out the playlist that Charles made at the bottom of this page. It's packed with the music he listens to when he’s down and needs a lift. Not a fake happy song kind of lift – something honest but also hopeful.

WARNING: The conversation with Lauren Slater in this show features frank discussion of depression and self-harm. The audio doesn't contain a trigger warning, but for listeners who may be sensitive to discussion of suicide, please consider listening to other interviews on the show separately, or skipping this episode.

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Airdates
March 24, 2018
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Last Updated: 
5 months 18 hours ago