Science and Technology

AYELET WALDMAN

How taking microdoses of LSD for a month helped her find a calm she hadn’t known for years.More

Radium Girls memorial

How painting radium on watches and instrument dials killed more than 50 young women working in Ottawa, Illinois.More

Clock

He’s one of the most frenetically productive, wired guys on the planet, but digital media theorist Douglas Rushkoff is backing away from the clock.More

Traveling into the phone

Doug Rushkoff believes personal technology is having an insidious effect on our relationship with time. He calls it “present shock.”More

Jaquet Droz automatons

Androids may seem like a modern idea, but there were life-size androids in the 18th century — beautiful robot women who could look around and even play the harpsichord. Historian Heidi Voskuhl tells this remarkable story.More

the next great novel

Will a computer ever write a great novel? Absolutely, says the pioneering software developer Stephen Wolfram. He believes there's no limit to computer creativity.More

Are we too reliant on phone apps?

Robots that clean the bathroom, cars that drive themselves, computers that diagnose disease. They may sound appealing, but technology writer Nicholas Carr warns that the new age of automation could mean we'll lose basic life skills.More

A light in the dark (from a phone)

Filmmaker Astra Taylor wants to reclaim the democratic potential of personal technology.More

Targeted person

Political microtargeters develop sophisticated and subterranean campaigns to win vulnerable voters. Cathy O'Neil, data scientist and author of the blog mathbabe.org, warns that politicians are perilously close to being able to tell voters only what they want to hear.More

Alex Honnold

He may have already conquered El Capitan, but Alex Honnold can dream up far more daring and dangerous adventures.More

ruined boats

There’s a lot of scientific debate about the future of climate change. But have you ever considered the worst case scenario? David Wallace-Wells gives us one terrifying glimpse into the future.More

Duca V Carlson

A Teen Vogue editor finds herself arguing with Tucker Carlson. And then it gets worse.More

athlete

You know those moments when everything clicks and you’re performing at your peak? There’s a science behind flow states.More

Glitched woman

Siri Hustvedt on developing voices on new platforms, all while coping with old-fashioned sexism. More

basketball

Neuroscientist John Krakauer blasts the “dumb jock” stereotype with research on the cognitive brilliance of athletes.More

shoe

So you’re a serious runner? Consider the Self-Transcendence Race, running around the same half-mile loop for 3,100 miles.More

Kambui Olujimi: The Drop, from the series InDecisive Moments, 2017. Glass, approx. 30 x 20 x 20 inches. Courtesy the artist.

It’s hard to wrap your head around climate change. How do you really take in the concept of planetary change over decades or even centuries? Visual artist Kambui Olujimi explores different ideas about time in his one-man show “Zulu Time.”More

headphones

Why we must take care in eschewing analog imperfection in pursuit of more perfect digital sound.More

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